Horticulture

Sustainable & Native Gardening

Native Gardening
Planting for Pollinators
Key to Identifying New England Plants
Flora Conservanda – online guide

Invasives & Pests

MG Kathy Nelson on the invasive Mile a Minute Vine in the NY Times
Invasive Species Management
Weed Identification
Weed Prevention
Guidelines for Disposal of Terrestrial Invasive Plants – UConn guide

A Unique Way to Deal with the Tomato Hornworm

Food

NOFA Farm and Food Guide 2013
Forgotten Foods in the Home Landscape
USDA Organic Resource Guide 2012

Design

Rain Garden—free Smart Phone App
Barking up the Right Tree by Kathy Diemer
Design Crutches by Kathleen Nelson
Design & Planning
Understanding Gardening Zones
Growing a Straw Bale Garden

Miscellaneous

UMass Extension Landscape, Nursery and Urban Forestry Program
The UMass Landscape Message
Gardening with Physical Limitations
The Informed Gardener – podcasts

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MAD GARDENER KATHY NELSON discusses the highly invasive Mile-A-Minute vine with Anne Raver in The New York Times. 

Read here.

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Going Native in Your Garden, digging into the magic and myths by Darrin Duling

The Native Plant Center in Valhalla provided us with this article from The National Gardener, written by Darrin Duling, director of  The NPC. To read please follow this link: Going Native in Your Garden

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Planting for Pollinators: Bees / Planting Chart—reference chart by Dr. Tristram Seidler

When planting your garden, refer to this chart to ensure a steady flow of pollinating bees into your garden during the year.  Dr. Tristram Seidler presented this year-round feeding chart during his presentation on bees at The New England Wild Flower Society’s 2011 Annual Meeting.

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Key to Identifying New England Plants

This key will help you identify over 1,200 common native and naturalized New England plants! Observe closely, collect a sample or take a photo, answer some questions, and narrow down to the correct identification.

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New Flora Conservanda Available Online

After 15 years of research, the new Flora Conservanda is available online by clicking here.   Written from a regional perspective, Flora Conservanda: New England 2012 is the New England Plant Conservation Program (NEPCoP) list of plants in need of conservation.  The list contains plants growing in New England that are globally, regionally and locally rare.  It also lists plants that are considered historic to New England (though they may exist elsewhere in the US or world) and plants whose status in the region is yet undetermined but are believed to be rare.  More research is needed to properly categorize these latter species.

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Invasive species and invasive species management—two excellent publications from the US Forest Service:

  • A Field Guide for the Identification of Invasive Plants in Southern Forests:  Field Guide
  • A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests:  Management Guide

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Identify Weeds in your Garden using UMASS’s Weed Herbarium

UMassWeeds in the UMass Weed Herbarium can be viewed by common name, scientific name or plant family. Images and notes to aid in identification are revealed by clicking on the weed name.  Visit umassweeds.org

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Weed Prevention

From “How to Eradicate Invasive Plants” by Teri Dunn Chase, published by Timber Press – Since it generally is easier to prevent a problem than to solve one, you might want to consider ways to keep weeds from infiltrating your property rather than wait until an infestation occurs and then look for ways to eliminate it. Yes, weeds are resourceful and have seemingly unlimited ways of moving from place to place, but you can do something about them long before you learn the name of the enemy weed.  Click here to read “9 Ways to Keep Out Invaders”

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Guidelines for Disposal of Terrestrial Invasive Plants – UConn Guide

UConnFrom UConn College of Agriculture and Natural Resources – click here for guide

 

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Hornworm - Photo by Scott Tully

Photo by Scott Tully

What We Did for (Tomato) Love – A Natural Way to Deal with the Tomato Hornworm from Megan Haney of Marble Valley Farm

What We Did for (Tomato) Love … or, The Charge of the Night Light Brigade … or, How Spencer’s Gifts Saved the Farm, while we’re at it. This story has so many angles I don’t even know where to begin … but let’s vote for my observant crew, who came back from twining the tomatoes, middle of last week, to tell me there were some hornworms eating the plants. Not having actually walked down one of our tomato rows in a few days, I was minimally concerned. We always get hornworms, we spend some time picking them off, we get a half-dozen or so per session, and life goes on. But when I got around to making a patrol a day or two later, Suddenly The Mood Turned Ugly. I found over a hundred worms one afternoon, another 100 the next, and saw evidence of 100s more in the form of highly decimated plants.  To continue reading please click here.

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NOFA Farm and Food Guide 2013

Discover local food near you.  Click here for the 2013 CT NOFA Farm and Food Guide.

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USDA Organic Resource Guide 2012 Available Online

USDAUSDA Organic Resource Guide 2012/Your Guide to Organic and Organic-Related USDA Programs is available online by clicking here.

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Forgotten Foods in the Home Landscape

David Buchanan, author of Taste, Memory, and speaker at our 2013 “Making an Entrance” symposium, provided us with the following links he feels would be of interest to anyone interested in this topic:

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Rain Garden—Smart Phone App from CT NEMO

This app, from CT NEMO (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officers) is aimed at homeowners, landscape professionals, municipal staff and others interested in properly installing one or more rain gardens. The app includes a searchable plant database and tools that help site, size and install your rain garden properly.  Download the app here.

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Barking Up The Right Tree by Kathy Diemer

Stewartia pseudocamellia River birch Dawn Redwood Curly willow

When hunting for a deciduous tree that will look smashing year ’round and not give you a lick of trouble, here are a few of my favorite decadently barked zone 5 hardies to consider….  Click here to read the full articleAlso, please visit Kathy Diemer’s blog at A Garden for All.

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Design Crutches by Kathleen Nelson

I’m not a natural designer, but have found a few simple tricks that help me make placement decisions.  These are all for after you’ve analyzed light, shade, tree roots, critters, moisture, drainage, soil type, view etc.  Click here to read the full article.

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Design and Planning by Walter Cudnohufsky

Walter Cudnohufsky spoke on design environments at the MG symposium in March 2011, and has graciously provided us with his design principles manuscript.  To download it, please follow this link.

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Understanding Gardening Zones by Janis Kieft

Cold Hardiness & Heat Zones
Gardeners can be conservative or adventurous, traditional or daring. The conservative or traditional gardener chooses plants they know will grow well in their garden. They depend on these plants for a successful garden year after year. The adventurous or daring gardener wants to push the limits and grow plants that are not commonly found in their area.   Click here to read the full article.

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Growing a Straw Bale Garden-NY Times article

From the New York Times, published  3.20.2013 – Do you have bad dirt? No dirt? Is the earth in your garden actually a sidewalk?  Has a soil-testing lab ever suggested that your gardening outfit should be a hazmat suit? Do you have a weed problem (and not that kind of weed problem)?  One last question: Are you ready to learn about a transformative garden technology that could change your life — for less than $100?  No? I wasn’t sold either when I first heard about a peculiar food-growing method called straw-bale gardening. Like me, you might have missed the Facebook page, “Learn to Grow a Straw Bale Garden,” which has registered an unlikely 21,000 “likes.” What you’ll soon learn there is that a straw-bale garden is a garden that has been grown in a straw bale. Really. Click here to read the full NY Times article by Michael Tortorello.

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The UMass Extension Landscape, Nursery and Urban Forestry Program

UMasshas announced its completely redesigned and revised web site.  Click here to learn more about its Nursery and Urban Forestry Program.

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The UMass Landscape Message

UMasshelps landscape, nursery and urban forestry professionals identify pests in the landscape, monitor their development, plan management strategies and create site-specific records for future management. Each LANDSCAPE MESSAGE includes valuable information from sites throughout Massachusetts: growing degree day accumulation, soil temperature, precipitation amounts, and plant phenology. Detailed reports on the status of insects, diseases, and weeds of interest to landscape and turf managers are also featured in each edition.  Click here to view the weekly UMass Landscape Message.

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Gardening with Physical Limitations

Let’s face it, gardeners age. Or, are afflicted with illnesses that can make gardening more difficult and less enjoyable.  However, thanks to creative and inventive minds, there are now a wide variety of excellent tools and techniques to take some of the aches and pains out of gardening.  Click here to read the full article. 

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The Informed Gardener – podcasts –Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott, Ph.D. – click here

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